Women in Medicine in Nineteenth-Century American Literature Book

Women in Medicine in Nineteenth-Century American Literature | Download eBook Read Pdf-ePub-Kindle

Download full pdf book Women in Medicine in Nineteenth-Century American Literature by Sara L. Crosby available in full 257 pages, and make sure to check out other latest books Literary Criticism related to Women in Medicine in Nineteenth-Century American Literature below.

Women in Medicine in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

By Sara L. Crosby
  • ISBN Code: : 3319964631
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Pages : 257
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Reads : 514
  • Book Compatibility : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Pdf : women-in-medicine-in-nineteenth-century-american-literature.pdf

Book Excerpt :

This book investigates how popular American literature and film transformed the poisonous woman from a misogynist figure used to exclude women and minorities from political power into a feminist hero used to justify the expansion of their public roles. Sara Crosby locates the origins of this metamorphosis in Uncle Tom’s Cabin where Harriet Beecher Stowe applied an alternative medical discourse to revise the poisonous Cassy into a doctor. The newly “medicalized” poisoner then served as a focal point for two competing narratives that envisioned the American nation as a multi-racial, egalitarian democracy or as a white and male supremacist ethno-state. Crosby tracks this battle from the heroic healers created by Stowe, Mary Webb, Oscar Micheaux, and Louisia May Alcott to the even more monstrous poisoners or “vampires” imagined by E. D. E. N. Southworth, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Theda Bara, Thomas Dixon, Jr., and D. W. Griffith.

Recommended Books For Reading


  • Female Physicians in American Literature
    Female Physicians in American Literature

    A Book written by Margaret Jay Jessee, published by Routledge 2021-12-29 - 108 pages - part of Literary Criticism books.

    Get eBook
  • Working Women in American Literature, 1865–1950
    Working Women in American Literature, 1865–1950

    A Book written by Miriam S. Gogol, published by Rowman & Littlefield 2018-08-15 - 184 pages - part of Literary Criticism books.

    Get eBook
  • Mothers and Daughters in Nineteenth-Century America
    Mothers and Daughters in Nineteenth-Century America

    A Book written by Nancy M. Theriot, published by University Press of Kentucky 2021-05-11 - 240 pages - part of Social Science books.

    Get eBook
  • The Woman as Slave in Nineteenth-Century American Social Movements
    The Woman as Slave in Nineteenth-Century American Social Movements

    A Book written by Ana Stevenson, published by Springer Nature 2020-02-03 - 362 pages - part of History books.

    Get eBook
  • Women in White Coats
    Women in White Coats

    A Book written by Olivia Campbell, published by Harlequin 2021-03-02 - 358 pages - part of Biography & Autobiography books.

    Get eBook
  • Imperatives of Care
    Imperatives of Care

    A Book written by Sonja M. Kim, published by University of Hawaii Press 2019-01-31 - 240 pages - part of History books.

    Get eBook
  • Women, Travel, and Science in Nineteenth-Century Americas
    Women, Travel, and Science in Nineteenth-Century Americas

    A Book written by Nina Gerassi-Navarro, published by Springer 2017-11-15 - 276 pages - part of Literary Criticism books.

    Get eBook

Read Also This Books

Women Healers and Physicians

By Lilian R. Furst
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
  • Book Code : 0813158540
  • Total of Pages : 272
  • Category : Medical
  • Members : 939
  • Pdf File: women-healers-and-physicians.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Women have traditionally been expected to tend the sick as part of their domestic duties; yet throughout history they have faced an uphill struggle to be accepted as healers outside the household. In this provocative anthology, twelve essays by historians and literary scholars explore the work of women as healers and physicians. The essays range across centuries, nations, and cultures to focus on the ideological and practical obstacles women have faced in the world of medicine. Each examines the situation of women healers in a particular time and place through cases that are emblematic of larger issues and controversies in that period. The stories presented here are typical of different but parallel facets of women's history in medicine. The first six concern the controversial relationship between magic and medicine and the perception that women healers can harm or enchant as well as cure. Women frequently were banished to the edges of medical practice because their spiritualism or unorthodoxy was considered a threat to conventional medicine. These chapters focus mainly on the Middle Ages and the Renaissance but also provide continuity to women healers in African American culture of our own time. The second six essays trace women healers' efforts to seek professional standing, first in fifth-century Greece and Rome and later, on a global scale, in the mid-nineteenth century. In addition to actual case studies from Germany, Russia, England, and Australia, these essays consider treatments of women doctors in American fiction and in the writings of Virginia Woolf. Women Healers and Physicians complements existing histories of women in medicine by drawing on varied historical and literary sources, filling gaps in our understanding of women healers and nulling social attitudes about them. Although the contributions differ dramatically, all retain a common focus and create a unique comparative picture of women's struggles to climb the long hill to acceptance in the medical profession.

Unwell Women

By Elinor Cleghorn
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Book Code : 0593182960
  • Total of Pages : 400
  • Category : History
  • Members : 281
  • Pdf File: unwell-women.pdf

Book Short Summary:

A trailblazing, conversation-starting history of women’s health—from the earliest medical ideas about women’s illnesses to hormones and autoimmune diseases—brought together in a fascinating sweeping narrative. Elinor Cleghorn became an unwell woman ten years ago. She was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease after a long period of being told her symptoms were anything from psychosomatic to a possible pregnancy. As Elinor learned to live with her unpredictable disease she turned to history for answers, and found an enraging legacy of suffering, mystification, and misdiagnosis. In Unwell Women, Elinor Cleghorn traces the almost unbelievable history of how medicine has failed women by treating their bodies as alien and other, often to perilous effect. The result is an authoritative and groundbreaking exploration of the relationship between women and medical practice, from the "wandering womb" of Ancient Greece to the rise of witch trials across Europe, and from the dawn of hysteria as a catchall for difficult-to-diagnose disorders to the first forays into autoimmunity and the shifting understanding of hormones, menstruation, menopause, and conditions like endometriosis. Packed with character studies and case histories of women who have suffered, challenged, and rewritten medical orthodoxy—and the men who controlled their fate—this is a revolutionary examination of the relationship between women, illness, and medicine. With these case histories, Elinor pays homage to the women who suffered so strides could be made, and shows how being unwell has become normalized in society and culture, where women have long been distrusted as reliable narrators of their own bodies and pain. But the time for real change is long overdue: answers reside in the body, in the testimonies of unwell women—and their lives depend on medicine learning to listen.

Pseudo-Science and Society in 19th-Century America

By Arthur Wrobel
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
  • Book Code : 0813186757
  • Total of Pages : 256
  • Category : Medical
  • Members : 201
  • Pdf File: pseudo-science-and-society-in-19th-century-america.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Progressive nineteenth-century Americans believed firmly that human perfection could be achieved with the aid of modern science. To many, the science of that turbulent age appeared to offer bright new answers to life's age-old questions. Such a climate, not surprisingly, fostered the growth of what we now view as "pseudo-sciences"—disciplines delicately balancing a dubious inductive methodology with moral and spiritual concerns, disseminated with a combination of aggressive entrepreneurship and sheer entertainment. Such "sciences" as mesmerism, spiritualism, homoeopathy, hydropathy, and phrenology were warmly received not only by the uninformed and credulous but also by the respectable and educated. Rationalistic, egalitarian, and utilitarian, they struck familiar and reassuring chords in American ears and gave credence to the message of reformers that health and happiness are accessible to all. As the contributors to this volume show, the diffusion and practice of these pseudo-sciences intertwined with all the major medical, cultural, religious, and philosophical revolutions in nineteenth-century America. Hydropathy and particularly homoeopathy, for example, enjoyed sufficient respectability for a time to challenge orthodox medicine. The claims of mesmerists and spiritualists appeared to offer hope for a new moral social order. Daring flights of pseudo-scientific thought even ventured into such areas as art and human sexuality. And all the pseudo-sciences resonated with the communitarian and women's rights movements. This important exploration of the major nineteenth-century pseudo-sciences provides fresh perspectives on the American society of that era and on the history of the orthodox sciences, a number of which grew out of the fertile soil plowed by the pseudo-scientists.

Health and Wellness in 19th-Century America

By John C. Waller
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : ABC-CLIO
  • Book Code : 0313380457
  • Total of Pages : 287
  • Category : History
  • Members : 225
  • Pdf File: health-and-wellness-in-19th-century-america.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This book provides a comprehensive description of what being sick and receiving "medical care" was like in 19th-century America, allowing modern readers to truly appreciate the scale of the improvements in healthcare theory and practice. Health and Wellness in 19th-Century America covers a period of dramatic change in the United States by examining our changing understanding of the nature of the disease burden, the increasing size of the nation, and our conceptions of sickness and health. With topics ranging from the unsanitary tenements of New York's Five Points, the field hospitals of the Civil War, and to the laboratories of Johns Hopkins Medical School, author John C. Waller reveals a complex picture of tradition, discovery, innovation, and occasional spectacular success. This book draws upon an extensive literature to document sickness and wellness in environments like rural homesteads, urban East-coast slums, and the hastily built cities of the West. It provides a fascinating historical examination of a century in which Americans made giant strides in understanding disease yet also clung to traditional methods and ideas, charting how U.S. medical science gradually transformed from being a backwater to a world leader in the field.

American Men and Women in Medicine, Applied Sciences and Engineering with Roots in Czechoslovakia

By Miloslav Rechcigl Jr.
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : AuthorHouse
  • Book Code : 1665514973
  • Total of Pages : 870
  • Category : Biography & Autobiography
  • Members : 547
  • Pdf File: american-men-and-women-in-medicine-applied-sciences-and-engineering-with-roots-in-czechoslovakia.pdf

Book Short Summary:

No comprehensive study has been undertaken about the American learned men and women with Czechoslovak roots. The aim of this work is to correct this glaring deficiency, with the focus on men and women in medicine, applied sciences and engineering. It covers immigration from the period of mass migration and beyond, irrespective whether they were born in their European ancestral homes or whether they have descended from them. This compendium clearly demonstrates the Czech and Slovak immigrants, including Bohemian Jews, have brought to the New World, in these areas, their talents, their ingenuity, the technical skills, their scientific knowhow, as well as their humanistic and spiritual upbringing, reflecting upon the richness of their culture and traditions, developed throughout centuries in their ancestral home. This accounts for their remarkable success and achievements of theses settlers in the New World, transcending through their descendants, as this publication demonstrates. The monograph has been organized into sections by subject areas, i.e., Medicine, Allied Health Sciences and Social Services, Agricultural and Food Science, Earth and Environmental Sciences and Engineering. Each individual entry is usually accompanied with literature, and additional biographical sources for readers who wish to pursue a deeper study. The selection of individuals has been strictly based on geographical vantage, without regards to their native language or ethnical background. Some of the entries may surprise you, because their Czech or Slovak ancestry has not been generally known. What is conspicuous is a large percentage of listed individuals being Jewish, which is a reflection of high-level of education and intellect of Bohemian Jews. A prodigious number of accomplished women in this study is also astounding, considering that, in the 19th century, they rarely had careers and most professions refused entry to them.

The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine

By Janice P. Nimura
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Book Code : 0393635554
  • Total of Pages : 352
  • Category : Medical
  • Members : 803
  • Pdf File: the-doctors-blackwell.pdf

Book Short Summary:

New York Times Bestseller Finalist for the 2022 Pulitzer Prize in Biography "Janice P. Nimura has resurrected Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell in all their feisty, thrilling, trailblazing splendor." —Stacy Schiff Elizabeth Blackwell believed from an early age that she was destined for a mission beyond the scope of "ordinary" womanhood. Though the world at first recoiled at the notion of a woman studying medicine, her intelligence and intensity ultimately won her the acceptance of the male medical establishment. In 1849, she became the first woman in America to receive an M.D. She was soon joined in her iconic achievement by her younger sister, Emily, who was actually the more brilliant physician. Exploring the sisters’ allies, enemies, and enduring partnership, Janice P. Nimura presents a story of trial and triumph. Together, the Blackwells founded the New York Infirmary for Indigent Women and Children, the first hospital staffed entirely by women. Both sisters were tenacious and visionary, but their convictions did not always align with the emergence of women’s rights—or with each other. From Bristol, Paris, and Edinburgh to the rising cities of antebellum America, this richly researched new biography celebrates two complicated pioneers who exploded the limits of possibility for women in medicine. As Elizabeth herself predicted, "a hundred years hence, women will not be what they are now."

Conduct Unbecoming a Woman

By Regina Morantz-Sanchez
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Book Code : 9780199729029
  • Total of Pages : 304
  • Category : History
  • Members : 714
  • Pdf File: conduct-unbecoming-a-woman.pdf

Book Short Summary:

In the spring of 1889, Brooklyn's premier newspaper, the Daily Eagle, printed a series of articles that detailed a history of midnight hearses and botched operations performed by a scalpel-eager female surgeon named Dr. Mary Dixon-Jones. The ensuing avalanche of public outrage gave rise to two trials--one for manslaughter and one for libel--that became a late nineteenth-century sensation. Vividly recreating both trials, Regina Morantz-Sanchez provides a marvelous historical whodunit, inviting readers to sift through the evidence and evaluate the witnesses. This intricately crafted and mesmerizing piece of history reads like a suspense novel which skillfully examines masculine and feminine ideals in the late 19th century. Jars of specimens and surgical mannequins became common spectacles in the courtroom, and the roughly 300 witnesses that testified represented a fascinating social cross-section of the city's inhabitants, from humble immigrant craftsmen and seamstresses to some of New York and Brooklyn's most prestigious citizens and physicians. Like many legal extravaganzas of our own time, the Mary Dixon-Jones trials highlighted broader social issues in America. It unmasked apprehension about not only the medical and social implications of radical gynecological surgery, but also the rapidly changing role of women in society. Indeed, the courtroom provided a perfect forum for airing public doubts concerning the reputation of one "unruly" woman doctor whose life-threatening procedures offered an alternative to the chronic, debilitating pain of 19th-century women. Clearly a extraordinary event in 1892, the cases disappeared from the historical record only a few years later. Conduct Unbecoming a Woman brilliantly reconstructs both the Dixon-Jones trials and the historic panorama that was 1890s Brooklyn.

Riotous Flesh

By April R. Haynes
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Book Code : 022628476X
  • Total of Pages : 256
  • Category : History
  • Members : 775
  • Pdf File: riotous-flesh.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Nineteenth-century America saw numerous campaigns against masturbation, which was said to cause illness, insanity, and even death. Riotous Flesh explores women’s leadership of those movements, with a specific focus on their rhetorical, social, and political effects, showing how a desire to transform the politics of sex created unexpected alliances between groups that otherwise had very different goals. As April R. Haynes shows, the crusade against female masturbation was rooted in a generally shared agreement on some major points: that girls and women were as susceptible to masturbation as boys and men; that “self-abuse” was rooted in a lack of sexual information; and that sex education could empower women and girls to master their own bodies. Yet the groups who made this education their goal ranged widely, from “ultra” utopians and nascent feminists to black abolitionists. Riotous Flesh explains how and why diverse women came together to popularize, then institutionalize, the condemnation of masturbation, well before the advent of sexology or the professionalization of medicine.

Gender Scripts in Medicine and Narrative

By Angela Laflen
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • Book Code : 1443822930
  • Total of Pages : 480
  • Category : Medical
  • Members : 642
  • Pdf File: gender-scripts-in-medicine-and-narrative.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Gender is an exciting area of current research in the medical humanities, and by combining the study of medical narratives with theories of gender and sexuality, the essays in Gender Scripts in Medicine and Narrative illustrate the power of gender stereotypes to shape the way medicine is practiced and perceived. The chapters of Gender Scripts in Medicine and Narrative investigate gendered perceptions and representations of healers and patients in fiction, memoir, popular literature, poetry, film, television, the history of science, new media, and visual art. The fourteen chapters of Gender Scripts in Medicine and Narrative are organized into four cohesive sections. These chapters investigate the impact of gender stereotypes on medical narratives from a variety of points of view, considering narratives from diverse languages, time periods, genres, and media. Each section addresses some of the most pressing and provocative issues in theories of gender and the medical humanities: I. Gendering the Medical Gaze and Pathology; II. Monitoring Race through Reproduction; III. Rescripting Trauma and Healing; and IV. Medical Masculinities. Along with these sections, Gender Scripts Medicine and Narrative features a preface by Rita Charon, MD, PhD, Director and Founder, The Program in Narrative Medicine, Columbia University, a foreword by Marcelline Block, and an introduction by Angela Laflen. This collection takes a truly interdisciplinary look at the topic of gender and medicine, and the impressive group of contributors to the anthology represent a wide range of academic fields of inquiry, including medical humanities, bioethics, English, modern languages, women’s studies, film theory, postcolonial theory, art history, the history of science and medicine, new media studies, theories of trauma, among others. This approach of crossing boundaries of genre and discipline makes the volume accessible to scholars who are concerned with narrative, gender, and/or medical ethics. Click here for a recent review of this title.

Race, Place, and Medicine

By Julyan G. Peard
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Duke University Press
  • Book Code : 0822381281
  • Total of Pages : 326
  • Category : History
  • Members : 165
  • Pdf File: race-place-and-medicine.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Race, Place, and Medicine examines the impact of a group of nineteenth-century Brazilian physicians who became known posthumously as the Bahian Tropicalista School of Medicine. Julyan G. Peard explores how this group of obscure clinicians became participants in an international debate as they helped change the scientific framework and practices of doctors in Brazil. Peard shows how the Tropicalistas adapted Western medicine and challenged the Brazilian medical status quo in order to find new answers to the old question of whether the diseases of warm climates were distinct from those of temperate Europe. They carried out innovative research on parasitology, herpetology, and tropical disorders, providing evidence that countered European assumptions about Brazilian racial and cultural inferiority. In the face of European fatalism about health care in the tropics, the Tropicalistas forged a distinctive medicine based on their beliefs that public health would improve only if large social issues—such as slavery and abolition—were addressed and that the delivery of health care should encompass groups hitherto outside the doctors’ sphere, especially women. But the Tropicalistas’ agenda, which included biting social critiques and broad demands for the extension of health measures to all of Brazil’s people, was not sustained. Race, Place, and Medicine shows how imported models of tropical medicine—constructed by colonial nations for their own needs—downplayed the connection between socioeconomic factors and tropical disorders. This study of a neglected episode in Latin American history will interest Brazilianists, as well as scholars of Latin American, medical, and scientific history.

A Companion to American Fiction, 1865 - 1914

By Robert Paul Lamb,G. R. Thompson
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
  • Book Code : 1405178310
  • Total of Pages : 640
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 463
  • Pdf File: a-companion-to-american-fiction-1865-1914.pdf

Book Short Summary:

A Companion to American Fiction, 1865-1914 is a groundbreaking collection of essays written by leading critics for a wide audience of scholars, students, and interested general readers. An exceptionally broad-ranging and accessible Companion to the study of American fiction of the post-civil war period and the early twentieth century Brings together 29 essays by top scholars, each of which presents a synthesis of the best research and offers an original perspective Divided into sections on historical traditions and genres, contexts and themes, and major authors Covers a mixture of canonical and the non-canonical themes, authors, literatures, and critical approaches Explores innovative topics, such as ecological literature and ecocriticism, children’s literature, and the influence of Darwin on fiction

Liminality, Hybridity, and American Women's Literature

By Kristin J. Jacobson,Kristin Allukian,Rickie-Ann Legleitner,Leslie Allison
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 3319738518
  • Total of Pages : 320
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 403
  • Pdf File: liminality-hybridity-and-american-women-s-literature.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This book highlights the multiplicity of American women’s writing related to liminality and hybridity from its beginnings to the contemporary moment. Often informed by notions of crossing, intersectionality, transition, and transformation, these concepts as they appear in American women’s writing contest as well as perpetuate exclusionary practices involving class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, and sex, among other variables. The collection’s introduction, three unit introductions, fourteen individual essays, and afterward facilitate a process of encounters, engagements, and conversations within, between, among, and across the rich polyphony that constitutes the creative acts of American women writers. The contributors offer fresh perspectives on canonical writers as well as introduce readers to new authors. As a whole, the collection demonstrates American women’s writing is “threshold writing,” or writing that occupies a liminal, hybrid space that both delimits borders and offers enticing openings.

The Routledge Research Companion to Law and Humanities in Nineteenth-Century America

By Nan Goodman,Simon Stern
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Taylor & Francis
  • Book Code : 1317042972
  • Total of Pages : 372
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 460
  • Pdf File: the-routledge-research-companion-to-law-and-humanities-in-nineteenth-century-america.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Nineteenth-century America witnessed some of the most important and fruitful areas of intersection between the law and humanities, as people began to realize that the law, formerly confined to courts and lawyers, might also find expression in a variety of ostensibly non-legal areas such as painting, poetry, fiction, and sculpture. Bringing together leading researchers from law schools and humanities departments, this Companion touches on regulatory, statutory, and common law in nineteenth-century America and encompasses judges, lawyers, legislators, litigants, and the institutions they inhabited (courts, firms, prisons). It will serve as a reference for specific information on a variety of law- and humanities-related topics as well as a guide to understanding how the two disciplines developed in tandem in the long nineteenth century.

Culinary Aesthetics and Practices in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

By M. Drews,M. Elbert
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 0230103146
  • Total of Pages : 267
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 393
  • Pdf File: culinary-aesthetics-and-practices-in-nineteenth-century-american-literature.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Culinary Aesthetics and Practices in Nineteenth-Century American Literature examines the preponderance of food imagery in nineteenth-century literary texts. Contributors to this volume analyze the social, political, and cultural implications of scenes involving food and dining and illustrate how "aesthetic" notions of culinary preparation are often undercut by the actual practices of cooking and eating. As contributors interrogate the values and meanings behind culinary discourses, they complicate commonplace notions about American identity and question the power structure behind food production and consumption.

LITTLE WOMEN and THE FEMINIST IMAGINATION

By Janice M. Alberghene,Beverly Lyon Clark
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1135593256
  • Total of Pages : 496
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 121
  • Pdf File: little-women-and-the-feminist-imagination.pdf

Book Short Summary:

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Lady Lushes

By Michelle L. McClellan
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Rutgers University Press
  • Book Code : 0813576997
  • Total of Pages : 254
  • Category : Medical
  • Members : 555
  • Pdf File: lady-lushes.pdf

Book Short Summary:

According to the popular press in the mid twentieth century, American women, in a misguided attempt to act like men in work and leisure, were drinking more. “Lady Lushes” were becoming a widespread social phenomenon. From the glamorous hard-drinking flapper of the 1920s to the disgraced and alcoholic wife and mother played by Lee Remick in the 1962 film “Days of Wine and Roses,” alcohol consumption by American women has been seen as both a prerogative and as a threat to health, happiness, and the social order. In Lady Lushes, medical historian Michelle L. McClellan traces the story of the female alcoholic from the late-nineteenth through the twentieth century. She draws on a range of sources to demonstrate the persistence of the belief that alcohol use is antithetical to an idealized feminine role, particularly one that glorifies motherhood. Lady Lushes offers a fresh perspective on the importance of gender role ideology in the formation of medical knowledge and authority.

Lady Lushes

By Michelle L. McClellan
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Rutgers University Press
  • Book Code : 0813577004
  • Total of Pages : 254
  • Category : Medical
  • Members : 566
  • Pdf File: lady-lushes.pdf

Book Short Summary:

According to the popular press in the mid twentieth century, American women, in a misguided attempt to act like men in work and leisure, were drinking more. “Lady Lushes” were becoming a widespread social phenomenon. From the glamorous hard-drinking flapper of the 1920s to the disgraced and alcoholic wife and mother played by Lee Remick in the 1962 film “Days of Wine and Roses,” alcohol consumption by American women has been seen as both a prerogative and as a threat to health, happiness, and the social order. In Lady Lushes, medical historian Michelle L. McClellan traces the story of the female alcoholic from the late-nineteenth through the twentieth century. She draws on a range of sources to demonstrate the persistence of the belief that alcohol use is antithetical to an idealized feminine role, particularly one that glorifies motherhood. Lady Lushes offers a fresh perspective on the importance of gender role ideology in the formation of medical knowledge and authority.

Gender and the Making of Modern Medicine in Colonial Egypt

By Hibba Abugideiri
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1317130359
  • Total of Pages : 287
  • Category : History
  • Members : 313
  • Pdf File: gender-and-the-making-of-modern-medicine-in-colonial-egypt.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Gender and the Making of Modern Medicine in Colonial Egypt investigates the use of medicine as a 'tool of empire' to serve the state building process in Egypt by the British colonial administration. It argues that the colonial state effectively transformed Egyptian medical practice and medical knowledge in ways that were decidedly gendered. On the one hand, women medical professionals who had once trained as 'doctresses' (hakimas) were now restricted in their medical training and therefore saw their social status decline despite colonial modernity's promise of progress. On the other hand, the introduction of colonial medicine gendered Egyptian medicine in ways that privileged men and masculinity. Far from being totalized colonial subjects, Egyptian doctors paradoxically reappropriated aspects of Victorian science to forge an anticolonial nationalist discourse premised on the Egyptian woman as mother of the nation. By relegating Egyptian women - whether as midwives or housewives - to maternal roles in the home, colonial medicine was determinative in diminishing what control women formerly exercised over their profession, homes and bodies through its medical dictates to care for others. By interrogating how colonial medicine was constituted, Hibba Abugideiri reveals how the rise of the modern state configured the social formation of native elites in ways directly tied to the formation of modern gender identities, and gender inequalities, in colonial Egypt.

Medical Progress and Social Reality

By Lilian R. Furst
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : State University of New York Press
  • Book Code : 0791491528
  • Total of Pages : 331
  • Category : Medical
  • Members : 874
  • Pdf File: medical-progress-and-social-reality.pdf

Book Short Summary:

An anthology of nineteenth-century literature about medicine and medical issues.

Ecogothic in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

By Dawn Keetley,Matthew Wynn Sivils
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1315464918
  • Total of Pages : 238
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 345
  • Pdf File: ecogothic-in-nineteenth-century-american-literature.pdf

Book Short Summary:

First Published in 2017. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

Gender, Sport, Science

By J. A. Mangan,Patricia Vertinsky
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1317968425
  • Total of Pages : 288
  • Category : Sports & Recreation
  • Members : 622
  • Pdf File: gender-sport-science.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Roberta J. Park has been throughout her distinguished career a scholar with a mission - to win academic recognition of the significance of the body in culture and cultures. Her scholarship has earned her global esteem in the disciplines of Physical Education and Sports Studies for its penetrating insights. This selection of her writings is a well-deserved tribute to her interpretive originality, her intellectual acuity and her ability to inspire colleagues and students. To explore unexplored patterns has been her extraordinary strength. The result has been continual originality of insight. These writings are thus a unique compilation of scholastic creativity of major interest to scholars and students in Sports Studies, Physical Education, Health Studies, Sociology and Social Psychology. This book was published as a special issue of the International Journal of the History of Sport.

Women and Work

By Christine Leiren Mower,Susanne Weil
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • Book Code : 1443824631
  • Total of Pages : 390
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 450
  • Pdf File: women-and-work.pdf

Book Short Summary:

While issues surrounding women and work may be more subtle today than in the past, problems of workplace equity, child-rearing, and domestic labor pose problems of balance that continue to evade solution as women today face substantial shifts in the meanings and practices of marriage, work, and reproduction amid a globalized economy. The essays in Women and Work: The Labors of Self-Fashioning explore how nineteenth- and twentieth-century US and British writers represent the work of being women—where “work” is defined broadly to encompass not only paid labor inside and outside the home, but also the work of performing femininity and domesticity. How did nineteenth- and twentieth-century US and British writers revise then-contemporary social assumptions about who should be performing work, and for what purpose? How fully did these writers perceive the class implications of their arguments for taking jobs outside the home? How does work, both inside and outside the home, contribute to female identity and, conversely, how does it promote what legal theorist Kenji Yoshino terms the demands of “covering”—women’s strategic use of stereotypes of femininity and masculinity to succeed in the marketplace? In articles appropriate for both upper-level undergraduate and graduate students in literature and literary history, women’s studies, feminist and gender studies, contributors engage these questions, covering both canonical and popular “middlebrow” nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers such as Gilman, Cather, Alcott, Schreiner, Wharton, Le Sueur, Gissing, Wood, Lewis and Mitchell. Women and Work will also interest scholars concerned with this developing discourse.

The Ethical Case against Animal Experiments

By Andrew Linzey,Clair Linzey
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Illinois Press
  • Book Code : 0252099923
  • Total of Pages : 224
  • Category : Nature
  • Members : 165
  • Pdf File: the-ethical-case-against-animal-experiments.pdf

Book Short Summary:

At present, human beings worldwide are using an estimated 115.3 million animals in experiments ”a normalization of the unthinkable on an immense scale. In terms of harm, pain, suffering, and death, animal experiments constitute one of the major moral issues of our time. Given today's deeper understanding of animal sentience, we must afford animals a special moral consideration that precludes their use in experiments. The Ethical Case against Animal Experiments begins with a groundbreaking and comprehensive ethical critique of the practice of animal experiments by the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics. A second section offers original writings that engage with, and elaborate on, aspects of the Oxford Centre report. The essayists explore historical, philosophical, and personal perspectives that range from animal experiments in classical times to the place of necessity in animal research to one researcher's painful journey from researcher to opponent. A devastating look at a contemporary moral crisis, The Ethical Case against Animal Experiments melds logic to compassion to mount a powerful challenge to human cruelty.

Pseudo-Science and Society in 19th-Century America

By Arthur Wrobel
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
  • Book Code : 0813165032
  • Total of Pages : 256
  • Category : Medical
  • Members : 730
  • Pdf File: pseudo-science-and-society-in-19th-century-america.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Progressive nineteenth-century Americans believed firmly that human perfection could be achieved with the aid of modern science. To many, the science of that turbulent age appeared to offer bright new answers to life's age-old questions. Such a climate, not surprisingly, fostered the growth of what we now view as "pseudo-sciences" -- disciplines delicately balancing a dubious inductive methodology with moral and spiritual concerns, disseminated with a combination of aggressive entrepreneurship and sheer entertainment. Such "sciences" as mesmerism, spiritualism, homoeopathy, hydropathy, and phrenology were warmly received not only by the uninformed and credulous but also by the respectable and educated. Rationalistic, egalitarian, and utilitarian, they struck familiar and reassuring chords in American ears and gave credence to the message of reformers that health and happiness are accessible to all. As the contributors to this volume show, the diffusion and practice of these pseudo-sciences intertwined with all the major medical, cultural, religious, and philosophical revolutions in nineteenth-century America. Hydropathy and particularly homoeopathy, for example, enjoyed sufficient respectability for a time to challenge orthodox medicine. The claims of mesmerists and spiritualists appeared to offer hope for a new moral social order. Daring flights of pseudo-scientific thought even ventured into such areas as art and human sexuality. And all the pseudo-sciences resonated with the communitarian and women's rights movements. This important exploration of the major nineteenth-century pseudo-sciences provides fresh perspectives on the American society of that era and on the history of the orthodox sciences, a number of which grew out of the fertile soil plowed by the pseudo-scientists.

Testimonial Advertising in the American Marketplace

By M. Moskowitz
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 0230101712
  • Total of Pages : 240
  • Category : History
  • Members : 337
  • Pdf File: testimonial-advertising-in-the-american-marketplace.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This book explores the history and practice of testimonial advertising in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day, addressing a surprising lack of scholarship on this enduring and pervasive marketing tool. Treating consumers as neither the victims nor the empowered foes of corporate practices, the authors gathered here contribute to new scholarship at the intersection of cultural and business history by examining how testimonials mediate negotiations between producers and consumers and shape modern cultural attitudes about social identity, advice, community, celebrity, and the consumption of brand-name goods and services.

Gender, Race and Family in Nineteenth Century America

By Rebecca Fraser
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 1137291850
  • Total of Pages : 218
  • Category : History
  • Members : 397
  • Pdf File: gender-race-and-family-in-nineteenth-century-america.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Sarah Hicks Williams was the northern-born wife of an antebellum slaveholder. Rebecca Fraser traces her journey as she relocates to Clifton Grove, the Williams' slaveholding plantation, presenting her with complex dilemmas as she reconciled her new role as plantation mistress to the gender script she had been raised with in the North.

Mothers and Medicine

By Rima D. Apple
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Univ of Wisconsin Press
  • Book Code : 029911483X
  • Total of Pages : 280
  • Category : Health & Fitness
  • Members : 330
  • Pdf File: mothers-and-medicine.pdf

Book Short Summary:

In the nineteenth century, infants were commonly breast-fed; by the middle of the twentieth century, women typically bottle-fed their babies on the advice of their doctors. In this book, Rima D. Apple discloses and analyzes the complex interactions of science, medicine, economics, and culture that underlie this dramatic shift in infant-care practices and women’s lives. As infant feeding became the keystone of the emerging specialty of pediatrics in the twentieth century, the manufacture of infant food became a lucrative industry. More and more mothers reported difficulty in nursing their babies. While physicians were establishing themselves and the scientific experts and the infant-food industry was hawking the scientific bases of their products, women embraced “scientific motherhood,” believing that science could shape child care practices. The commercialization and medicalization of infant care established an environment that made bottle feeding not only less feared by many mothers, but indeed “natural” and “necessary.” Focusing on the history of infant feeding, this book clarifies the major elements involved in the complex and sometimes contradictory interaction between women and the medical profession, revealing much about the changing roles of mothers and physicians in American society. “The strength of Apple’s book is her ability to indicate how the mutual interests of mothers, doctors, and manufacturers led to the transformation of infant feeding. . . . Historians of science will be impressed with the way she probes the connections between the medical profession and the manufacturers and with her ability to demonstrate how medical theories were translated into medical practice.”—Janet Golden, Isis

Power Politics in Marriage and Medical Attitudes in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s "The Yellow Wallpaper"

By Berina Hodzic
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : GRIN Verlag
  • Book Code : 3668265151
  • Total of Pages : 15
  • Category : Literary Collections
  • Members : 256
  • Pdf File: power-politics-in-marriage-and-medical-attitudes-in-charlotte-perkins-gilman-s-the-yellow-wallpaper.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 1,7, Ruhr-University of Bochum (Englisches Seminar), course: Women’s Literature: From Anti-Slavery to Economic Independence, language: English, abstract: In my paper I would like to examine how Gilman’s 19th century short story "The Yellow Wallpaper" engages with the power politics of marriage and the medical attitudes towards women in the 19th-century U.S. society. I would like to argue that in Gilman’s autobiographical story, the female protagonist, who undergoes the rest cure, escapes from the oppression through the patriarchal institutions of marriage and medicine in search of personal and intellectual independence. The realist narrative provides peculiar imagery that depicts the idea of a power structure regulated by male authority and women’s subordinate position in society. My purpose here is to give a brief insight into medical care in the 19th century but also to portray the depression and the treatment Gilman herself underwent. In doing so I would like to reflect on Gilman’s motivation for writing “The Yellow Wallpaper” and to reconstruct the social context by calling into question her nonfictional work “The Man-Made World”. The main part of my investigation will cover the analysis of the short story with the main focus being/put on the key trope, in which I will proceed chronologically. Finally, my inquiry will close with pointing out the main achievements and effects the short story had on contemporary society and readership.

Caring and Curing

By Dianne Elizabeth Dodd,Deborah Gorham
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Ottawa Press
  • Book Code : 0776603876
  • Total of Pages : 218
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 99
  • Pdf File: caring-and-curing.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This collection of essays takes the reader from the early 19th century struggle between female midwives and male physicians right up to the late 20th century emergence of professionally trained women physicians vying for a place in the medical hierarchy. The bitter conflict for control of birthing and other aspects of domestic health care between female lay healers, particularly midwives, and the emerging male-dominated medical profession is examined from new perspectives. Published in English.

Domesticity in the Making of Modern Science

By Donald L. Opitz,Staffan Bergwik,Brigitte Van Tiggelen
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 1137492732
  • Total of Pages : 299
  • Category : Science
  • Members : 460
  • Pdf File: domesticity-in-the-making-of-modern-science.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The history of the modern sciences has long overlooked the significance of domesticity as a physical, social, and symbolic force in the shaping of knowledge production. This book provides a welcome reorientation to our understanding of the making of the modern sciences globally by emphasizing the centrality of domesticity in diverse scientific enterprises.

A Companion to American Literary Studies

By Caroline F. Levander,Robert S. Levine
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
  • Book Code : 1444343785
  • Total of Pages : 608
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 816
  • Pdf File: a-companion-to-american-literary-studies.pdf

Book Short Summary:

A Companion to American Literary Studies addresses the most provocative questions, subjects, and issues animating the field. Essays provide readers with the knowledge and conceptual tools for understanding American literary studies as it is practiced today, and chart new directions for the future of the subject. Offers up-to-date accounts of major new critical approaches to American literary studies Presents state-of-the-art essays on a full range of topics central to the field Essays explore critical and institutional genealogies of the field, increasingly diverse conceptions of American literary study, and unprecedented material changes such as the digital revolution A unique anthology in the field, and an essential resource for libraries, faculty, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates