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Neither Settler nor Native

By Mahmood Mamdani
  • ISBN Code: : 0674249976
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Pages : 416
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 254
  • Book Compatibility : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Pdf : neither-settler-nor-native.pdf

Book Excerpt :

Shortlisted for the British Academy Book Prize for Global Cultural Understanding Making the radical argument that the nation-state was born of colonialism, this book calls us to rethink political violence and reimagine political community beyond majorities and minorities. In this genealogy of political modernity, Mahmood Mamdani argues that the nation-state and the colonial state created each other. In case after case around the globe—from the New World to South Africa, Israel to Germany to Sudan—the colonial state and the nation-state have been mutually constructed through the politicization of a religious or ethnic majority at the expense of an equally manufactured minority. The model emerged in North America, where genocide and internment on reservations created both a permanent native underclass and the physical and ideological spaces in which new immigrant identities crystallized as a settler nation. In Europe, this template would be used by the Nazis to address the Jewish Question, and after the fall of the Third Reich, by the Allies to redraw the boundaries of Eastern Europe’s nation-states, cleansing them of their minorities. After Nuremberg the template was used to preserve the idea of the Jews as a separate nation. By establishing Israel through the minoritization of Palestinian Arabs, Zionist settlers followed the North American example. The result has been another cycle of violence. Neither Settler nor Native offers a vision for arresting this historical process. Mamdani rejects the “criminal” solution attempted at Nuremberg, which held individual perpetrators responsible without questioning Nazism as a political project and thus the violence of the nation-state itself. Instead, political violence demands political solutions: not criminal justice for perpetrators but a rethinking of the political community for all survivors—victims, perpetrators, bystanders, beneficiaries—based on common residence and the commitment to build a common future without the permanent political identities of settler and native. Mamdani points to the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa as an unfinished project, seeking a state without a nation.

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Book Short Summary:

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Traces of History presents a new approach to race and to comparative colonial studies. Bringing a historical perspective to bear on the regimes of race that colonizers have sought to impose on Aboriginal people in Australia, on Blacks and Native Americans in the United States, on Ashkenazi Jews in Western Europe, on Arab Jews in Israel/Palestine, and on people of African descent in Brazil, this book shows how race marks and reproduces the different relationships of inequality into which Europeans have coopted subaltern populations: territorial dispossession, enslavement, confinement, assimilation, and removal. Charting the different modes of domination that engender specific regimes of race and the strategies of anti-colonial resistance they entail, the book powerfully argues for cross-racial solidarities that respect these historical differences.

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  • Pdf File: white-freedom.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The racist legacy behind the Western idea of freedom The era of the Enlightenment, which gave rise to our modern conceptions of freedom and democracy, was also the height of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. America, a nation founded on the principle of liberty, is also a nation built on African slavery, Native American genocide, and systematic racial discrimination. White Freedom traces the complex relationship between freedom and race from the eighteenth century to today, revealing how being free has meant being white. Tyler Stovall explores the intertwined histories of racism and freedom in France and the United States, the two leading nations that have claimed liberty as the heart of their national identities. He explores how French and American thinkers defined freedom in racial terms and conceived of liberty as an aspect and privilege of whiteness. He discusses how the Statue of Liberty—a gift from France to the United States and perhaps the most famous symbol of freedom on Earth—promised both freedom and whiteness to European immigrants. Taking readers from the Age of Revolution to today, Stovall challenges the notion that racism is somehow a paradox or contradiction within the democratic tradition, demonstrating how white identity is intrinsic to Western ideas about liberty. Throughout the history of modern Western liberal democracy, freedom has long been white freedom. A major work of scholarship that is certain to draw a wide readership and transform contemporary debates, White Freedom provides vital new perspectives on the inherent racism behind our most cherished beliefs about freedom, liberty, and human rights.

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  • Pdf File: an-indigenous-peoples-history-of-the-united-states.pdf

Book Short Summary:

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Begin Again

By Eddie S. Glaude Jr.
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Crown
  • Book Code : 0525575340
  • Total of Pages : 288
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 729
  • Pdf File: begin-again.pdf

Book Short Summary:

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A powerful study of how to bear witness in a moment when America is being called to do the same.”—Time James Baldwin grew disillusioned by the failure of the civil rights movement to force America to confront its lies about race. What can we learn from his struggle in our own moment? Named one of the best books of the year by Time, The Washington Post, and the Chicago Tribune • Winner of the Stowe Prize • Shortlisted for the Goddard Riverside Stephan Russo Book Prize for Social Justice “Not everything is lost. Responsibility cannot be lost, it can only be abdicated. If one refuses abdication, one begins again.”—James Baldwin Begin Again is one of the great books on James Baldwin and a powerful reckoning with America’s ongoing failure to confront the lies it tells itself about race. Just as in Baldwin’s “after times,” argues Eddie S. Glaude Jr., when white Americans met the civil rights movement’s call for truth and justice with blind rage and the murders of movement leaders, so in our moment were the Obama presidency and the birth of Black Lives Matter answered with the ascendance of Trump and the violent resurgence of white nationalism. In these brilliant and stirring pages, Glaude finds hope and guidance in Baldwin as he mixes biography—drawn partially from newly uncovered Baldwin interviews—with history, memoir, and poignant analysis of our current moment to reveal the painful cycle of Black resistance and white retrenchment. As Glaude bears witness to the difficult truth of racism’s continued grip on the national soul, Begin Again is a searing exploration of the tangled web of race, trauma, and memory, and a powerful interrogation of what we must ask of ourselves in order to call forth a new America.

Governance and Inclusive Growth in the Africa Great Lakes Region

By Paul Mulindwa
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1000600068
  • Total of Pages : 194
  • Category : Business & Economics
  • Members : 135
  • Pdf File: governance-and-inclusive-growth-in-the-africa-great-lakes-region.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This book provides a comprehensive analysis of the development and governance nexus in Africa’s Great Lakes region. The Great Lakes region continues to experience many challenges, yet much of the literature continues to focus on political governance, leaving behind the socio-economic aspects of the everyday lives of people in the region. This book seeks to bridge this gap in information, considering the social, economic, and cultural dynamics of the population as they inter-play with political discourse as key factors of sustainable development. Drawing on empirical cases and examples from Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, and Uganda, the book analyses each of the major governance and development issues in Great Lakes region of Africa, including region building and integration, social protection, inter-state relations, democracy and participation, and sustainability. Written by an African scholar with over 20 years of experience of working with indigenous groups in over 34 African countries, this book will be an important read for students and scholars across the fields of international relations, political studies, sustainable development (social and economic), sociology, public policy and management and public administration.

Relating Indigenous and Settler Identities

By A. Bell
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 1137313560
  • Total of Pages : 251
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 297
  • Pdf File: relating-indigenous-and-settler-identities.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This book uses identity theories to explore the struggles of indigenous peoples against the domination of the settler imaginary in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. The book argues that a new relational imaginary can revolutionize the way settler peoples think about and relate to indigenous difference.

Mobilizing Narratives

By Hager Ben Driss
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • Book Code : 1527573001
  • Total of Pages : 170
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 708
  • Pdf File: mobilizing-narratives.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Edward Said’s summation that “we live in a period of migration, of forced travel and forced residence, that has literally engulfed the globe” is an apt description of the riveting and pervasive nature of (im)mobility in contemporary times. Wars, climate change, economic recessions, and social and cultural inequalities all contribute to coercing both individuals and communities into forced movement or imposed immobility. This volume investigates the injustices related to free circulation as represented in various literary texts.

Colonialism

By Lorenzo Veracini
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Taylor & Francis
  • Book Code : 1000634159
  • Total of Pages : 228
  • Category : History
  • Members : 472
  • Pdf File: colonialism.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Colonialism: A Global History interprets colonialism as an unequal relationship characterised by displacement and domination, and reveals the ways in which this relationship has been constitutive of global modernity. The volume focuses on colonialism’s dynamism, adaptability, and resilience. It appraises a number of successive global colonial ‘waves’, each constituting a specific form of colonial domination, each different from the previous ones, each affecting different locales at different times, and each characterised by a particular method of exploiting colonised populations and territories. Outlining a succession of distinct colonising conjunctures, and the ways in which they ‘washed over’ what is today understood as the ‘Global South’, shaping and reshaping institutions and prompting diverse responses from colonised communities, Colonialism: A Global History also outlines the contemporary relevance of this unequal relation. Overall, it provides an original definition of colonialism and tells the global history of this mode of domination’s evolution and reach. The broad chronological and geographical scope makes this volume the ideal resource for all students and scholars interested in globalisation, colonialism, and empire.

Learning and Reconciliation Through Indigenous Education in Oceania

By Pangelinan, Perry Jason Camacho,McVey, Troy
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : IGI Global
  • Book Code : 1799877388
  • Total of Pages : 330
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 653
  • Pdf File: learning-and-reconciliation-through-indigenous-education-in-oceania.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The mission of higher education in the 21st century must address the reconciliation of student learning and experiences through the lens of indigenous education and frameworks. Higher learning institutions throughout the oceanic countries have established frameworks for addressing indigeneity through the infusion of an indigenous perspectives curriculum. The incorporation of island indigenous frameworks into their respective curriculums, colleges, and universities in the oceanic countries has seen positive impact results on student learning, leading to the creation of authentic experiences in higher education landscapes. Learning and Reconciliation Through Indigenous Education in Oceania discusses ways of promoting active student learning and unique experiences through indigenous scholarship and studies among contemporary college students. It seeks to provide an understanding of the essential link between practices for incorporating island indigenous curriculum, strategies for effective student learning, and course designs which are aligned with frameworks that address indigeneity, and that place college teachers in the role of leaders for lifelong learning through indigenous scholarship and studies in Oceania. It is ideal for professors, practitioners, researchers, scholars, academicians, students, administrators, curriculum developers, and classroom designers.

Exceptionally Queer

By K. Mohrman
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : U of Minnesota Press
  • Book Code : 1452967520
  • Total of Pages : 376
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 107
  • Pdf File: exceptionally-queer.pdf

Book Short Summary:

How perceptions of Mormonism from 1830 to the present reveal the exclusionary, racialized practices of the U.S. nation-state Are Mormons really so weird? Are they potentially queer? These questions occupy the heart of this powerful rethinking of Mormonism and its place in U.S. history, culture, and politics. K. Mohrman argues that Mormon peculiarity is not inherent to the Latter-day Saint faith tradition, as is often assumed, but rather a potent expression of U.S. exceptionalism. Exceptionally Queer scrutinizes the history of Mormonism starting with its inception in the early 1830s and continuing to the present. Drawing on a wide range of historical texts and moments—from nineteenth-century battles over Mormon plural marriage; to the LDS Church’s emphases on “individual responsibility” and “family values”; to mainstream media’s coverage of the LDS Church’s racist exclusion of Black priesthood holders, its Native assimilation programs, and vehement opposition to the Equal Rights Amendment; and to much more recent legal and cultural battles over same-sex marriage and on-screen Mormon polygamy—Exceptionally Queer evaluates how Mormonism has been used to motivate and rationalize the biased, exclusionary, and colonialist policies and practices of the U.S. nation-state. Mohrman explains that debates over Mormonism both drew on and shaped racial discourses and, in so doing, delineated the boundaries of whiteness and national belonging, largely through the consolidation of (hetero)normative ideas of sex, marriage, family, and economy. Ultimately, the author shows how discussions of Mormonism in this country have been and continue to be central to ideas of what it means to be American.

A Field Guide to White Supremacy

By Kathleen Belew,Ramon A. Gutierrez
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Book Code : 0520382536
  • Total of Pages : 424
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 386
  • Pdf File: a-field-guide-to-white-supremacy.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Drawing explicit lines, across time and a broad spectrum of violent acts, to provide the definitive field guide for understanding and opposing white supremacy in America Hate, racial violence, exclusion, and racist laws receive breathless media coverage, but such attention focuses on distinct events that gain our attention for twenty-four hours. The events are presented as episodic one-offs, unfortunate but uncanny exceptions perpetrated by lone wolves, extremists, or individuals suffering from mental illness—and then the news cycle moves on. If we turn to scholars and historians for background and answers, we often find their knowledge siloed in distinct academic subfields, rarely connecting current events with legal histories, nativist insurgencies, or centuries of misogynist, anti-Black, anti-Latino, anti-Asian, and xenophobic violence. But recent hateful actions are deeply connected to the past—joined not only by common perpetrators, but by the vast complex of systems, histories, ideologies, and personal beliefs that comprise white supremacy in the United States. Gathering together a cohort of researchers and writers, A Field Guide to White Supremacy provides much-needed connections between violence present and past. This book illuminates the career of white supremacist and patriarchal violence in the United States, ranging across time and impacted groups in order to provide a working volume for those who wish to recognize, understand, name, and oppose that violence. The Field Guide is meant as an urgent resource for journalists, activists, policymakers, and citizens, illuminating common threads in white supremacist actions at every scale, from hate crimes and mass attacks to policy and law. Covering immigration, antisemitism, gendered violence, lynching, and organized domestic terrorism, the authors reveal white supremacy as a motivating force in manifold parts of American life. The book also offers a sampling of some of the most recent scholarship in this area in order to spark broader conversations between journalists and their readers, teachers and their students, and activists and their communities. A Field Guide to White Supremacy will be an indispensable resource in paving the way for politics of alliance in resistance and renewal.

Escape from Moneyville

By Shiraz Durrani
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : African Books Collective
  • Book Code : 9914987516
  • Total of Pages : 70
  • Category : Juvenile Fiction
  • Members : 961
  • Pdf File: escape-from-moneyville.pdf

Book Short Summary:

It was a cold, dark night. Everything was quiet. A Mawingo bus was travelling from Nairobi to Mombasa. It had big signs painted on the outside: Danger- man. It had travelled over two hundred kilometres and was approaching Mtito Andei. Everybody in the bus was fast asleep. Everyone, that is, except four people. So begins an adventure for four Kenyan youths, two boys and two girls, that explores the depth of deprivation and disaster that capitalism has been for working people in Kenya. Tricked into becoming forced workers for a factory with owners from USA, Britain and Japan, the youth live the harsh life of exploited workers. However, their sense of justice soon turns them into rebels seeking life and freedom. The story takes them through life-threatening adventures, fighting the armed forces summoned by the factory owners. Will they manage to survive the brutal attacks by fierce dogs and armed militia? Will they live to see the sea at Mombasa they had set out for?

Rhetorics of the Americas

By D. Baca,V. Villanueva
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 0230102115
  • Total of Pages : 270
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 657
  • Pdf File: rhetorics-of-the-americas.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This is the first work to begin to fill a gap: an understanding of discourse aimed to persuade within the Pre-Columbian Americas. The contributors in this collection offer glimpses of what those indigenous rhetorics might have looked like and how their influences remain. The reader is invivted to recognize "the invention of the Americas," providing other ways to contemplate material life prior to contemporary capitalism, telling us about the global from long ago to current global capitalism. This book is the drop that will ripple, creating new lines of inquiry into language use within the Americas and the legacies of genocide, conquest, and cultural survival.