Building a State in Apache Land Book

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Building a State in Apache Land

By Charles D. Poston
  • ISBN Code: : N.a
  • Publisher : Good Press
  • Pages : 135
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 499
  • Book Compatibility : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Pdf : building-a-state-in-apache-land.pdf

Book Excerpt :

"Building a State in Apache Land" by Charles D. Poston. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

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Race and U.S. Foreign Policy in the Ages of Territorial and Market Expansion, 1840-1900

By E. Nathaniel Gates
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1135661227
  • Total of Pages : 424
  • Category : Political Science
  • Members : 430
  • Pdf File: race-and-u-s-foreign-policy-in-the-ages-of-territorial-and-market-expansion-1840-1900.pdf

Book Short Summary:

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Fugitive Landscapes

By Samuel Truett
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Yale University Press
  • Book Code : 0300135327
  • Total of Pages : 272
  • Category : History
  • Members : 959
  • Pdf File: fugitive-landscapes.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Published in Cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest StudiesIn the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Mexicans and Americans joined together to transform the U.S.–Mexico borderlands into a crossroads of modern economic development. This book reveals the forgotten story of their ambitious dreams and their ultimate failure to control this fugitive terrain. Focusing on a mining region that spilled across the Arizona–Sonora border, this book shows how entrepreneurs, corporations, and statesmen tried to domesticate nature and society within a transnational context. Efforts to tame a “wild” frontier were stymied by labor struggles, social conflict, and revolution. Fugitive Landscapes explores the making and unmaking of the U.S.–Mexico border, telling how ordinary people resisted the domination of empires, nations, and corporations to shape transnational history on their own terms. By moving beyond traditional national narratives, it offers new lessons for our own border-crossing age.

Line in the Sand

By Rachel St. John
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Book Code : 1400838630
  • Total of Pages : 296
  • Category : History
  • Members : 780
  • Pdf File: line-in-the-sand.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Line in the Sand details the dramatic transformation of the western U.S.-Mexico border from its creation at the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848 to the emergence of the modern boundary line in the first decades of the twentieth century. In this sweeping narrative, Rachel St. John explores how this boundary changed from a mere line on a map to a clearly marked and heavily regulated divide between the United States and Mexico. Focusing on the desert border to the west of the Rio Grande, this book explains the origins of the modern border and places the line at the center of a transnational history of expanding capitalism and state power in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Moving across local, regional, and national scales, St. John shows how government officials, Native American raiders, ranchers, railroad builders, miners, investors, immigrants, and smugglers contributed to the rise of state power on the border and developed strategies to navigate the increasingly regulated landscape. Over the border's history, the U.S. and Mexican states gradually developed an expanding array of official laws, ad hoc arrangements, government agents, and physical barriers that did not close the line, but made it a flexible barrier that restricted the movement of some people, goods, and animals without impeding others. By the 1930s, their efforts had created the foundations of the modern border control apparatus. Drawing on extensive research in U.S. and Mexican archives, Line in the Sand weaves together a transnational history of how an undistinguished strip of land became the significant and symbolic space of state power and national definition that we know today.

Wars for Empire

By Janne Lahti
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Book Code : 0806159332
  • Total of Pages : 328
  • Category : History
  • Members : 200
  • Pdf File: wars-for-empire.pdf

Book Short Summary:

After the end of the U.S.-Mexican War in 1848, the Southwest Borderlands remained hotly contested territory. Over following decades, the United States government exerted control in the Southwest by containing, destroying, segregating, and deporting indigenous peoples—in essence conducting an extended military campaign that culminated with the capture of Geronimo and the forced removal of the Chiricahua Apaches in 1886. In this book, Janne Lahti charts these encounters and the cultural differences that shaped them. Wars for Empire offers a new perspective on the conduct, duration, intensity, and ultimate outcome of one of America's longest wars. Centuries of conflict with Spain and Mexico had honed Apache war-making abilities and encouraged a culture based in part on warrior values, from physical prowess and specialized skills to a shared belief in individual effort. In contrast, U.S. military forces lacked sufficient training and had little public support. The splintered, protracted, and ferocious warfare exposed the limitations of the U.S. military and of federal Indian policies, challenging narratives of American supremacy in the West. Lahti maps the ways in which these weaknesses undermined the U.S. advance. He also stresses how various Apache groups reacted differently to the U.S. invasion. Ultimately, new technologies, the expansion of Euro-American settlements, and decades of war and deception ended armed Apache resistance. By comparing competing martial cultures and examining violence in the Southwest, Wars for Empire provides a new understanding of critical decades of American imperial expansion and a moment in the history of settler colonialism with worldwide significance.

The Black Legend

By Doug Hocking
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Book Code : 1493034464
  • Total of Pages : 328
  • Category : History
  • Members : 877
  • Pdf File: the-black-legend.pdf

Book Short Summary:

In 1861, war between the United States and the Chiricahua seemed inevitable. The Apache band lived on a heavily traveled Emigrant and Overland Mail Trail and routinely raided it, organized by their leader, the prudent, not friendly Cochise. When a young boy was kidnapped from his stepfather’s ranch, Lieutenant George Bascom confronted Cochise even though there was no proof that the Chiricahua were responsible. After a series of missteps, Cochise exacted a short-lived revenge. Despite modern accounts based on spurious evidence, Bascom’s performance in a difficult situation was admirable. This book examines the legend and provides a new analysis of Bascom’s and Cochise’s behavior, putting it in the larger context of the Indian Wars that followed the American Civil War.

Legal Codes and Talking Trees

By Katrina Jagodinsky
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Yale University Press
  • Book Code : 0300220812
  • Total of Pages : 352
  • Category : History
  • Members : 475
  • Pdf File: legal-codes-and-talking-trees.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Katrina Jagodinsky’s enlightening history is the first to focus on indigenous women of the Southwest and Pacific Northwest and the ways they dealt with the challenges posed by the existing legal regimes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In most western states, it was difficult if not impossible for Native women to inherit property, raise mixed-race children, or take legal action in the event of rape or abuse. Through the experiences of six indigenous women who fought for personal autonomy and the rights of their tribes, Jagodinsky explores a long yet generally unacknowledged tradition of active critique of the U.S. legal system by female Native Americans.

Go East, Young Man

By Richard Francaviglia
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University Press of Colorado
  • Book Code : 087421811X
  • Total of Pages : 350
  • Category : History
  • Members : 946
  • Pdf File: go-east-young-man.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Transference of orientalist images and identities to the American landscape and its inhabitants, especially in the West—in other words, portrayal of the West as the “Orient”—has been a common aspect of American cultural history. Place names, such as the Jordan River or Pyramid Lake, offer notable examples, but the imagery and its varied meanings are more widespread and significant. Understanding that range and significance, especially to the western part of the continent, means coming to terms with the complicated, nuanced ideas of the Orient and of the North American continent that European Americans brought to the West. Such complexity is what historical geographer Richard Francaviglia unravels in this book. Since the publication of Edward Said’s book, Orientalism, the term has come to signify something one-dimensionally negative. In essence, the orientalist vision was an ethnocentric characterization of the peoples of Asia (and Africa and the “Near East”) as exotic, primitive “others” subject to conquest by the nations of Europe. That now well-established point, which expresses a postcolonial perspective, is critical, but Francaviglia suggest that it overlooks much variation and complexity in the views of historical actors and writers, many of whom thought of western places in terms of an idealized and romanticized Orient. It likewise neglects positive images and interpretations to focus on those of a decadent and ostensibly inferior East. We cannot understand well or fully what the pervasive orientalism found in western cultural history meant, says Francaviglia, if we focus only on its role as an intellectual engine for European imperialism. It did play that role as well in the American West. One only need think about characterizations of American Indians as Bedouins of the Plains destined for displacement by a settled frontier. Other roles for orientalism, though, from romantic to commercial ones, were also widely in play. In Go East, Young Man, Francaviglia explores a broad range of orientalist images deployed in the context of European settlement of the American West, and he unfolds their multiple significances.

Borderline Americans

By Katherine Benton-Cohen
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Book Code : 0674053559
  • Total of Pages : 384
  • Category : History
  • Members : 595
  • Pdf File: borderline-americans.pdf

Book Short Summary:

“Are you an American, or are you not?” This is the question at the heart of Katherine Benton-Cohen’s provocative history, which ties that seemingly remote corner of the country to one of America’s central concerns: the historical creation of racial boundaries. By showing the multiple possibilities for racial meanings in America, Benton-Cohen’s insightful and informative work challenges our assumptions about race and national identity.

The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction

By Linda Gordon
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Book Code : 0674061713
  • Total of Pages : 432
  • Category : History
  • Members : 191
  • Pdf File: the-great-arizona-orphan-abduction.pdf

Book Short Summary:

In 1904, New York nuns brought forty Irish orphans to a remote Arizona mining camp, to be placed with Catholic families. The Catholic families were Mexican, as was the majority of the population. Soon the town's Anglos, furious at this "interracial" transgression, formed a vigilante squad that kidnapped the children and nearly lynched the nuns and the local priest. The Catholic Church sued to get its wards back, but all the courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, ruled in favor of the vigilantes. The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction tells this disturbing and dramatic tale to illuminate the creation of racial boundaries along the Mexican border. Clifton/Morenci, Arizona, was a "wild West" boomtown, where the mines and smelters pulled in thousands of Mexican immigrant workers. Racial walls hardened as the mines became big business and whiteness became a marker of superiority. These already volatile race and class relations produced passions that erupted in the "orphan incident." To the Anglos of Clifton/Morenci, placing a white child with a Mexican family was tantamount to child abuse, and they saw their kidnapping as a rescue. Women initiated both sides of this confrontation. Mexican women agreed to take in these orphans, both serving their church and asserting a maternal prerogative; Anglo women believed they had to "save" the orphans, and they organized a vigilante squad to do it. In retelling this nearly forgotten piece of American history, Linda Gordon brilliantly recreates and dissects the tangled intersection of family and racial values, in a gripping story that resonates with today's conflicts over the "best interests of the child."

The Apaches

By Donald E. Worcester
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Book Code : 0806187344
  • Total of Pages : 407
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 696
  • Pdf File: the-apaches.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Until now Apache history has been fragmented, offered in books dealing with specific bands or groups-the Mescaleros, Mimbreños, Chiricahuas, and the more distant Kiowa Apaches, Lipans, and Jicarillas. In this book, Donald E. Worcester synthesizes the total historical experience of the Apaches, from the post-Conquest Spanish era to the late twentieth century. In clear, fluent prose he focuses primarily on the nineteenth century, the era of the Apaches' sometimes splintered but always determined resistance to the white intruders. They were never a numerous tribe, but, in their daring and skill as commando-like raiders, they well deserved the name "Eagles of the Southwest." The book highlights the many defensive stands and the brilliant assaults the Apaches made on their enemies. The only effective strategy against them was to divide and conquer, and the Spaniards (and after them the Anglo-Americans) employed it extensively, using renegade Indians as scouts, feeding traveling bands, and trading with them at their presidios and missions. When the Mexican Revolution disrupted this pattern in 1810, the Apaches again turned to raiding, and the Apache wars that erupted with the arrival of the Anglo-Americans constitute some of the most sensational chapters in America's military annals. The author describes the Apaches' life today on the Arizona and New Mexico reservations, where they manage to preserve some of the traditional ceremonies, while trying to provide livelihoods for all their people. The Apaches still have a proud history in their struggles against overwhelming odds of numbers and weaponry. Worcester here re-creates that history in all its color and drama.

The Valiant Women

By Jeanne Williams
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Open Road Media
  • Book Code : 1504036387
  • Total of Pages : 496
  • Category : Fiction
  • Members : 881
  • Pdf File: the-valiant-women.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Winner of the Spur Award: The first volume in a breathtaking trilogy of historical romance novels inspired by the daring men and women who settled Arizona. Patrick O’Shea’s spirit watches his naked, parched body crawl through rock and thorn before leaving him for dead. All hope is lost until Socorro, a Spanish beauty of noble birth and the sole survivor of an attack on her wedding party as it journeyed to California, finds Shea and slowly, painfully revives him. When he’s able to walk again and they’ve dried enough roots and cactus fruit to travel some distance, the pair heads north. At a smoldering ranchero, they extract an arrowhead from Santiago, the half-Mexican, half-Apache survivor of a raid by gringo scalp hunters whose gruesome trophies—as long as they’re dark-haired enough to pass for Indian—fetch a high price from the governor of Sonora. Eager for vengeance but needing time to recover from his injuries, Santiago joins Shea and Socorro on their journey to a peaceful, stream-watered valley in the rolling foothills of Arizona, where they take in Tjúni, a Papago woman who managed to escape an Apache raid but lost her entire family. The four refugees must rely on their courage, loyalty, and resolve to build a new home and fend off bandits. They win the friendship and protection of a great Apache chief, Mangus Coloradas, who allows Shea—after he proves his bravery by enduring a red-hot iron to the cheek—to become the guardian of Talitha, a Mormon captive, and her two-year-old, half-Apache brother, James. Over the years, Talitha grows into a stunning, headstrong beauty whose love for her foster father burns with passionate intensity. A page-turning saga of destiny and desire set during a fascinating period in American history, The Valiant Women is as vibrant and unforgettable as the sunset over a desert canyon.

Where the Red-Winged Blackbirds Sing

By Jennifer Bess
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University Press of Colorado
  • Book Code : 1646421051
  • Total of Pages : 436
  • Category : History
  • Members : 292
  • Pdf File: where-the-red-winged-blackbirds-sing.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Where the Red-Winged Blackbirds Sing examines the ways in which the Akimel O’odham (“River People”) and their ancestors, the Huhugam, adapted to economic, political, and environmental constraints imposed by federal Indian policy, the Indian Bureau, and an encroaching settler population in Arizona’s Gila River Valley. Fundamental to O’odham resilience was their connection to their sense of peoplehood and their himdag (“lifeway”), which culminated in the restoration of their water rights and a revitalization of their Indigenous culture. Author Jennifer Bess examines the Akimel O’odham’s worldview, which links their origins with a responsibility to farm the Gila River Valley and to honor their history of adaptation and obligations as “world-builders”—co-creators of an evermore life-sustaining environment and participants in flexible networks of economic exchange. Bess considers this worldview in context of the Huhugam–Akimel O’odham agricultural economy over more than a thousand years. Drawing directly on Akimel O’odham traditional ecological knowledge, innovations, and interpretive strategies in archives and interviews, Bess shows how the Akimel O’odham engaged in agricultural economy for the sake of their lifeways, collective identity, enduring future, and actualization of the values modeled in their sacred stories. Where the Red-Winged Blackbirds Sing highlights the values of adaptation, innovation, and co-creation fundamental to Akimel O’odham lifeways and chronicles the contributions the Akimel O’odham have made to American history and to the history of agriculture. The book will be of interest to scholars of Indigenous, American Southwestern, and agricultural history.

Desert Cities

By Michael F. Logan
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Pittsburgh Pre
  • Book Code : 0822971100
  • Total of Pages : 240
  • Category : History
  • Members : 246
  • Pdf File: desert-cities.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Examines the natural and economic resource competition between Phoenix and Tucson and the other factors contributing to the divergent growth of the two cities.

Mining the Borderlands

By Sarah E. M. Grossman
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Nevada Press
  • Book Code : 1943859841
  • Total of Pages : 240
  • Category : Technology & Engineering
  • Members : 933
  • Pdf File: mining-the-borderlands.pdf

Book Short Summary:

At the dawn of the twentieth century, the US-Mexico border was home to some of the largest and most technologically advanced industrial copper mines. This despite being geographically, culturally, and financially far-removed from traditional urban centers of power. Mining the Borderlands argues that this was only possible because of the emergence of mining engineers—a distinct technocratic class of professionals who connected capital, labor, and expertise. Mining engineers moved easily between remote mining camps and the upscale parlors of east coast investors. Working as labor managers and technical experts, they were involved in the daily negotiations, which brought private US capital to the southwestern border. The success of the massive capital-intensive mining ventures in the region depended on their ability to construct different networks, serving as intermediaries to groups that rarely coincided. Grossman argues that this didn’t just lead to bigger and more efficient mines, but served as part of the ongoing project of American territorial and economic expansion. By integrating the history of technical expertise into the history of the transnational mining industry, this in-depth look at borderlands mining explains how American economic hegemony was established in a border region peripheral to the federal governments of both Washington, D.C. and Mexico City.

Mestizo

By Arnoldo Carlos Vento
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University Press of America
  • Book Code : 1461684730
  • Total of Pages : 336
  • Category : History
  • Members : 938
  • Pdf File: mestizo.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This text covers over 2,000 years, tracing the roots of the contemporary Mexican-American. It utilizes the fields of history, political science, cultural anthropology, folklore, literature, sociolinguistics, Latin American studies and ethnic studies.

ONCE THEY MOVED LIKE THE WIND: COCHISE, GERONIMO,

By David Roberts
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Book Code : 1451639880
  • Total of Pages : 368
  • Category : History
  • Members : 500
  • Pdf File: once-they-moved-like-the-wind.pdf

Book Short Summary:

During the westward settlement, for more than twenty years Apache tribes eluded both US and Mexican armies, and by 1886 an estimated 9,000 armed men were in pursuit. Roberts (Deborah: A Wilderness Narrative) presents a moving account of the end of the Indian Wars in the Southwest. He portrays the great Apache leaders—Cochise, Nana, Juh, Geronimo, the woman warrior Lozen—and U.S. generals George Crock and Nelson Miles. Drawing on contemporary American and Mexican sources, he weaves a somber story of treachery and misunderstanding. After Geronimo's surrender in 1886, the Apaches were sent to Florida, then to Alabama where many succumbed to malaria, tuberculosis and malnutrition and finally in 1894 to Oklahoma, remaining prisoners of war until 1913. The book is history at its most engrossing. —Publishers Weekly

Prestatehood Legal Materials

By Michael Chiorazzi
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1136766014
  • Total of Pages : 1564
  • Category : History
  • Members : 942
  • Pdf File: prestatehood-legal-materials.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Explore the controversial legal history of the formation of the United States Prestatehood Legal Materials is your one-stop guide to the history and development of law in the U.S. and the change from territory to statehood. Unprecedented in its coverage of territorial government, this book identifies a wide range of available resources from each state to reveal the underlying legal principles that helped form the United States. In this unique publication, a state expert compiles each chapter using his or her own style, culminating in a diverse sourcebook that is interesting as well as informative. In Prestatehood Legal Materials, you will find bibliographies, references, and discussion on a varied list of source materials, including: state codes drafted by Congress county, state, and national archives journals and digests state and federal reports, citations, surveys, and studies books, manuscripts, papers, speeches, and theses town and city records and documents Web sites to help your search for more information and more Prestatehood Legal Materials provides you with brief overviews of state histories from colonization to acceptance into the United States. In this book, you will see how foreign countries controlled the laws of these territories and how these states eventually broke away to govern themselves. The text also covers the legal issues with Native Americans, inter-state and the Mexico and Canadian borders, and the development of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of state government. This guide focuses on materials that are readily available to historians, political scientists, legal scholars, and researchers. Resources that assist in locating not-so-easily accessible materials are also covered. Special sections focus on the legal resources of colonial New York City and Washington, DC—which is still technically in its prestatehood stage. Due to the enormity of this project, the editor of Prestatehood Legal Materials created a Web page where updates, corrections, additions and more will be posted.

State Out of the Union

By Jeff Biggers
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Nation Books
  • Book Code : 156858704X
  • Total of Pages : 288
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 716
  • Pdf File: state-out-of-the-union.pdf

Book Short Summary:

State Out of the Union is award-winning journalist and historian Jeff Biggers' riveting account of Arizona, the famed frontier state whose conflict over immigration and state's rights has become a national bellwether. Biggers shows how Arizona's long history of labor and civil rights battles, its contentious entry into the union, as well as cyclical upheavals over immigration rights, place the state front and center in a greater American story playing out across the United States. From President Eisenhower's Operation Wetback to the legacy of Arizona native son César Chávez to the powerful influence of the state's politicians, like Sen. Barry Goldwater and Tea Party President Russell Pearce, Biggers reveals how Arizona has played a pivotal role in determining the nation's conservative and liberal agendas. Today, more than 25 state legislatures have introduced anti-immigration bills that are virtual copies of Arizona's controversial SB 1070 "papers please" law. The state is ground zero in the clash over a historic demographic shift taking place across the country with the rise of a newly empowered Latino electorate. But Arizona is not only home to some of the most virulent anti-immigration legislation in the country--it is also the birthplace of a new movement of young Latino activists and allies who have not only challenged the self-proclaimed architect of SB 1070 in a historic recall election, but are also mobilizing to defend the state's education system from censorship. A lasting and important work of cultural history, State Out of the Union vividly unveils the showdown over the American Dream in Arizona--and its impact on the future of the nation.

Wicked Prescott

By Parker Anderson
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Arcadia Publishing
  • Book Code : 1625857063
  • Total of Pages : 144
  • Category : True Crime
  • Members : 161
  • Pdf File: wicked-prescott.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Swindlers, confidence men and outlaws—the mountain shadows and Ponderosa pines surrounding Prescott conceal their grim histories and crooked ways. The small hamlet turned mining town became Arizona’s first capital in 1864, and with wealth and power came every type of vice and crime. One block west of the famed Whiskey Row, the roaring red-light district attracted ladies of easy virtue, who often became victims of crimes of passion and coldblooded murder. Legendary crook Fleming “Jim” Parker escaped from Yavapai County Jail on the back of the sheriff’s stolen horse. Cattle rustlers terrorized nearby ranches, while tavern brawls and liquor-fueled shootouts dominated newspaper headlines. More than ten legal hangings brought criminals to justice. Local author Parker Anderson recounts these and more wicked misdeeds from Prescott’s wild early days.

The Landscapes of Western Movies

By Jeremy Agnew
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : McFarland
  • Book Code : 1476642230
  • Total of Pages : 230
  • Category : Performing Arts
  • Members : 750
  • Pdf File: the-landscapes-of-western-movies.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Western films have often been tributes to place and setting, with the magnificent backdrops mirroring the wildness of the narratives. As the splendid outdoor scenery of Westerns could not be found on a studio back lot or on a Hollywood sound stage, the movies have been filmed in the wide open spaces of the American West and beyond. This book chronicles the history of filming Westerns on location, from shooting on the East Coast in the early 1900s; through the use of locations in Utah, Arizona, and California in the 1940s and 1950s; and filming Westerns in Mexico, Spain, and other parts of the world in the 1960s. Also studied is the relationship between the filming location timeline and the evolving motion picture industry of the twentieth century, and how these factors shaped audience perceptions of the "Real West."

A State-by-State History of Race and Racism in the United States [2 volumes]

By Patricia Reid-Merritt
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : ABC-CLIO
  • Book Code : 144085601X
  • Total of Pages : 921
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 162
  • Pdf File: a-state.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Providing chronologies of important events, historical narratives from the first settlement to the present, and biographies of major figures, this work offers readers an unseen look at the history of racism from the perspective of individual states. • Comprises detailed narratives encompassing the first European contact to the present day of the unique racial history of all 50 states and the District of Columbia • Provides a chronology of important racial events, achievements, and milestones for the states, plus the District of Columbia • Offers biographies of individuals who successfully confronted racism in America and removed obstacles to social achievement • Includes sidebars highlighting interesting events, individuals, and accomplishments relevant to the racial history of particular states

Oak Flat

By Lauren Redniss
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Random House
  • Book Code : 0399589740
  • Total of Pages : 288
  • Category : Comics & Graphic Novels
  • Members : 326
  • Pdf File: oak-flat.pdf

Book Short Summary:

NATIONAL BESTSELLER • A powerful work of visual nonfiction about three generations of an Apache family struggling to protect sacred land from a multinational mining corporation, by MacArthur “Genius” and National Book Award finalist Lauren Redniss, the acclaimed author of Thunder & Lightning “Brilliant . . . virtuosic . . . a master storyteller of a new order.”—Eliza Griswold, The New York Times Book Review (Editors’ Choice) NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY KIRKUS REVIEWS Oak Flat is a serene high-elevation mesa that sits above the southeastern Arizona desert, fifteen miles to the west of the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation. For the San Carlos tribe, Oak Flat is a holy place, an ancient burial ground and religious site where Apache girls celebrate the coming-of-age ritual known as the Sunrise Ceremony. In 1995, a massive untapped copper reserve was discovered nearby. A decade later, a law was passed transferring the area to a private company, whose planned copper mine will wipe Oak Flat off the map—sending its natural springs, petroglyph-covered rocks, and old-growth trees tumbling into a void. Redniss’s deep reporting and haunting artwork anchor this mesmerizing human narrative. Oak Flat tells the story of a race-against-time struggle for a swath of American land, which pits one of the poorest communities in the United States against the federal government and two of the world’s largest mining conglomerates. The book follows the fortunes of two families with profound connections to the contested site: the Nosies, an Apache family whose teenage daughter is an activist and leader in the Oak Flat fight, and the Gorhams, a mining family whose patriarch was a sheriff in the lawless early days of Arizona statehood. The still-unresolved Oak Flat conflict is ripped from today’s headlines, but its story resonates with foundational American themes: the saga of westward expansion, the resistance and resilience of Native peoples, and the efforts of profiteers to control the land and unearth treasure beneath it while the lives of individuals hang in the balance.

The Everything Kids' States Book

By Brian Thornton
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Book Code : 1605502685
  • Total of Pages : 144
  • Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Members : 178
  • Pdf File: the-everything-kids-states-book.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Which lake in Massachusetts has one of the longest names of any body of water in the United States? Which U.S. state began as a prison? In which state is half of the popcorn eaten in America is grown and packaged? You'll learn all of this and more fun facts and interesting trivia about the history, geography and landmarks in all of the 50 states - from California and Washington all the way to Maine and Florida--in The Everything Kids' States Book. Packed with 30 puzzles like dot-to-dots, mazes, word searches, rebus puzzles riddles, and more, The Everything Kids' States Book will take you on an unforgettable journey across the U.S. of A.!

Collaboration in Archaeological Practice

By Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh,T. J. Ferguson
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Rowman Altamira
  • Book Code : 0759113564
  • Total of Pages : 300
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 963
  • Pdf File: collaboration-in-archaeological-practice.pdf

Book Short Summary:

In Collaboration in Archaeological Practice, prominent archaeologists reflect on their experiences collaborating with descendant communities (peoples whose ancestors are the subject of archaeological research).

New Natures

By Dolly Jørgensen,Finn Arne Jørgensen,Sara B. Pritchard
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Pittsburgh Pre
  • Book Code : 0822978725
  • Total of Pages : 272
  • Category : Technology & Engineering
  • Members : 989
  • Pdf File: new-natures.pdf

Book Short Summary:

New Natures broadens the dialogue between the disciplines of science and technology studies (STS) and environmental history in hopes of deepening and even transforming understandings of human-nature interactions. The volume presents richly developed historical studies that explicitly engage with key STS theories, offering models for how these theories can help crystallize central lessons from empirical histories, facilitate comparative analysis, and provide a language for complicated historical phenomena. Overall, the collection exemplifies the fruitfulness of cross-disciplinary thinking. The chapters follow three central themes: ways of knowing, or how knowledge is produced and how this mediates our understanding of the environment; constructions of environmental expertise, showing how expertise is evaluated according to categories, categorization, hierarchies, and the power afforded to expertise; and lastly, an analysis of networks, mobilities, and boundaries, demonstrating how knowledge is both diffused and constrained and what this means for humans and the environment. Contributors explore these themes by discussing a wide array of topics, including farming, forestry, indigenous land management, ecological science, pollution, trade, energy, and outer space, among others. The epilogue, by the eminent environmental historian Sverker Sörlin, views the deep entanglements of humans and nature in contemporary urbanity and argues we should preserve this relationship in the future. Additionally, the volume looks to extend the valuable conversation between STS and environmental history to wider communities that include policy makers and other stakeholders, as many of the issues raised can inform future courses of action.

Making Settler Cinemas

By P. Limbrick
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 0230107915
  • Total of Pages : 272
  • Category : History
  • Members : 382
  • Pdf File: making-settler-cinemas.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Through a shrewd analysis of the historical experience of imperialism and settler colonialism, Limbrick draws new conclusions about their effect on cinematic production, distribution, reception and filmic discourse.

Sacred Places North America

By Brad Olsen
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : CCC Publishing
  • Book Code : 1888729333
  • Total of Pages : 408
  • Category : Travel
  • Members : 878
  • Pdf File: sacred-places-north-america.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This revised and updated comprehensive travel guide examines North America's most sacred sites for spiritually attuned explorers. Important archaeological, geological, and historical destinations from coast to coast are exhaustively examined, from the weathered pueblos of the American Southwest and the medicine wheels of western Canada to Graceland and the birthplace of Martin Luther King, Jr. Histories and cultural contexts are objectively surveyed, along with the latest academic theories and insightful metaphysical ruminations. Detailed maps, drawings, and travel directions are also included.

New Mexico - A Guide To The Colorful State

By Joseph Miller
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Read Books Ltd
  • Book Code : 1447495330
  • Total of Pages : 588
  • Category : History
  • Members : 706
  • Pdf File: new-mexico-a-guide-to-the-colorful-state.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Location Filming in Arizona

By Lili DeBarbieri
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Arcadia Publishing
  • Book Code : 1625845197
  • Total of Pages : 176
  • Category : Photography
  • Members : 447
  • Pdf File: location-filming-in-arizona.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The scenic natural vistas of Arizona's deserts and mountains have made it a favorite backdrop of movies and television shows. Westerns such as silent-era pictures derived from Zane Grey fiction through the John Ford-John Wayne classics "Stagecoach "and "The Searchers "benefited from the beautiful and rugged landscapes. TV classics such as "Gunsmoke" and "Little House on the Prairie" helped define Arizona's allure for Hollywood. Oscar winners "Jerry Maguire" and "Little Miss Sunshine "took advantage of the infrastructure that accumulated to lure filmmakers to Tucson, Yuma, Phoenix, Prescott, Sedona and all corners of the Grand Canyon State". Join author Lili DeBarbieri as she looks at the movies and shows shot in the state, as well as other aspects of Arizona film culture.

Native Peoples of the World: An Encylopedia of Groups, Cultures and Contemporary Issues

By Steven L. Danver
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1317464001
  • Total of Pages : 1030
  • Category : History
  • Members : 536
  • Pdf File: native-peoples-of-the-world.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This work examines the world's indigenous peoples, their cultures, the countries in which they reside, and the issues that impact these groups.

A History of the Indians of the United States

By Angie Debo
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Book Code : 0806189657
  • Total of Pages : 464
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 972
  • Pdf File: a-history-of-the-indians-of-the-united-states.pdf

Book Short Summary:

In 1906 when the Creek Indian Chitto Harjo was protesting the United States government's liquidation of his tribe's lands, he began his argument with an account of Indian history from the time of Columbus, "for, of course, a thing has to have a root before it can grow." Yet even today most intelligent non-Indian Americans have little knowledge of Indian history and affairs those lessons have not taken root. This book is an in-depth historical survey of the Indians of the United States, including the Eskimos and Aleuts of Alaska, which isolates and analyzes the problems which have beset these people since their first contacts with Europeans. Only in the light of this knowledge, the author points out, can an intelligent Indian policy be formulated. In the book are described the first meetings of Indians with explorers, the dispossession of the Indians by colonial expansion, their involvement in imperial rivalries, their beginning relations with the new American republic, and the ensuing century of war and encroachment. The most recent aspects of government Indian policy are also detailed the good and bad administrative practices and measures to which the Indians have been subjected and their present situation. Miss Debo's style is objective, and throughout the book the distinct social environment of the Indians is emphasized—an environment that is foreign to the experience of most white men. Through ignorance of that culture and life style the results of non-Indian policy toward Indians have been centuries of blundering and tragedy. In response to Indian history, an enlightened policy must be formulated: protection of Indian land, vocational and educational training, voluntary relocation, encouragement of tribal organization, recognition of Indians' social groupings, and reliance on Indians' abilities to direct their own lives. The result of this new policy would be a chance for Indians to live now, whether on their own land or as adjusted members of white society. Indian history is usually highly specialized and is never recorded in books of general history. This book unifies the many specialized volumes which have been written about their history and culture. It has been written not only for persons who work with Indians or for students of Indian culture, but for all Americans of good will.